Home Sweet Brussels

Whilst the countdown to my return to Japan continues (5 months to go!), the return to my ‘capital of the EU’ home in Brussels was less of a wait. Shortly before I left Brussels in August, I found out that the pastor and his family (the Goens) at my LifePoint church would be returning indefinitely to Smyrna, Tennessee in early December. Unexpectedly, I ended up returning to the UK in August whilst they were on holiday so I wasn’t able to say goodbye. This gave me the perfect excuse to justify an almost-urgent return to Brussels before the end of the year. Continuing the LifePoint theme, I visited Bettina, a friend who had also worshipped at LifePoint and had moved on to do an internship in Salzburg, Austria. I’m all about making the most of other people’s exciting locations and of course, for other people to make the most of mine (come to Scotland any time!).

The week in which I chose to make my LifePoint tour could not have been more perfectly timed. Two weeks before my visit, I received an e-mail from Chloé who, together with a team from the church, was organising a surprise party for the Goens on the very Saturday evening that I arrived in Brussels. Shut up! I know, it was too cool. I jumped on a bus at Brussels airport and 30 minutes later, jumped off at the church building which just happens to be on the airport route. Rocking up at LifePoint, knowing that so many people whom I loved were waiting inside, was extremely exciting and the hugs and embraces that followed instantly made the mad journey to get there worthwhile.

these crazy americans

those crazy americans are such a bad influence

After a couple of hours of catching up, taking ridiculous photos and generally enjoying the buzz of being back, I ventured on to Le Pantin, a quirky, second-hand-style bar which sits just off the square at Flagey. Here I met up with friends from Scotland House, the building in which I had worked whilst living in Brussels. Although I was exhausted (4 countries later), it was really good to see the group again and hear about their world that is still very familiar to me.

Too little sleep later, I awoke, took the metro to my beloved Schuman and then continuing the theme of holiday extravagance, took a taxi in order to arrive at church on time. Continuing the theme of continuing themes and the theme of perfect timing, it was the last time that Kyle, the pastor, would preach before he headed back to the States. Being back at LifePoint felt much the same as my entire trip to Brussels felt: completely normal. After church, myself and my good friend Lisa headed to the Grand Place for some obligatory frites and general wowing at the always-impressive centre.

we forgot how good these tasted. yumEEE.

we forgot how good these tasted. yumEEE.

From there, we headed to Café de la Presse, situated on Avenue Louise, which I had heard so much about but never visited. Here we met up with Eleanor, a friend from my previous work at Scotland Europa, and I watched on as my two friends bonded and I nursed my lack-of-voice with a malteser latte, nyum. It was so nice to chill out at a café with friends whom I love, and rarely see, and with whom I had to make no effort, which was just as well with my lack of vocals.

we’re very serious people

why hello there deliciousness

Before we left the café, Veronika, a friend whom I have known since my Utrecht days, came to meet us and join Lisa and I as we headed to the second-in-history LifePoint Brussels baptism service. Yes, you may have noticed it was quite the LifePoint-packed weekend. God’s perfect timing.  We watched on as three couples professed their faith and were baptised by Kyle. It was such an uplifting hour and special time to share with my LifePoint family. The weekend came to the perfect close as I headed back to the Goens to stay in their house for a final night of hearty food and fellowship. At the far too early time of 5.45am the following morning, I woke up, exited into the darkness of a Brussels morning and made the long journey home. That is, to another home. Until we meet again Brussels.

back with the joy of pheobe joy!

an epic feast with an epic family

4/5 of the super cool team goen

hanging oot with 4/5 of the super cool team goen

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InterRailing Lufthansa Style

If I had to choose between living abroad and travelling abroad, I would definitely choose the former. Of course, I love to travel, but I’d much rather have my own room, not be living out of a suitcase, and not feel like I have to be up and about every moment of the day to make the most of a vacation. I’m getting old, it’s taking its toll! Living abroad, from my experience, means that every day you wake up somewhere that’s a little bit different and you continue to feel a sense of excitement despite the routine of daily life.

This in part may explain why I’ve never gone inter-railing – travelling by train through continental Europe for an extended period of time. However, my travels on Saturday made me feel like I might as well have been, as I travelled through four countries to get to my final destination. Pre-warning: this blog post is entirely about that journey!

Just before going to bed on Friday night, I booked a Bavaria ticket for my train journey the following day. For €22, this ticket gives you unlimited travel for 24 hrs throughout the region of Bavaria as well as destinations just outside of it, such as Salzburg, Kufstein, Reuttea and Ulm. However, it can only be used on regional trains; not long-distance trains as I found out the hard way midway through my train journey. I had wondered why my return leg to Munich was considerably more comfortable than my outbound journey, as I plugged my phone charger into the socket by my seat. Right enough, I was on a long-distance train with the wrong ticket. After a confusing conversation with the very patient train conductor, I got off the train at the next stop. However, thankfully I did some speedy calculations in my head and realised I’d probably miss my flight if I didn’t stay on the long-distance train. At the very last minute I pushed the conductor out of the way and dove back on to the train, just before it pulled away. I like to think I provided some entertainment for the other passengers, if nothing else. I had to buy a new ticket at €36 or thereabouts which was sad for my credit card, but knowing how short my trip to Brussels was going to be as it was, I didn’t want it to be shortened any further.

By 12pm, I already felt like I’d had enough adventure for one day. But the day had only just begun. Though I had travelled with Easyjet from Edinburgh to Munich, I’d booked the rest of my flights on STA travel, and my cheapest option, though it had not been cheap at all, was to fly with the Lufthansa group. I guess Lufthansa have a monopoly on flights to/from Germany and so the way it worked out,  it was actually cheaper for me to fly to Switzerland first, than it was to fly directly to Brussels. Cue me wasting my entire afternoon flying to Zurich for no necessary reason and spending almost £10 on a Burger King meal. Seriously, Switzerland. Seriously?!

I’d booked this flight route and my Brussels-Edinburgh flight route together. In the latter, I had to fly south to Frankfurt before then flying north again to Edinburgh. What a kipuffle.

Just after 6pm, I finally arrived at Brussels Zaventem airport and basked in the knowledge that from thereon in, I would understand the country, I would know which transport route to take; I was back home.

the highlight of my pointless trip to zurich was getting a free coffee from this machine in the lufthansa terminal

back in a country i understand! belgium, it’s good to be home.

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Magical Even in November

It’s fair to say I probably came to Salzburg at the wrong time of year. Don’t get me wrong, I have no doubt that it’s a beautiful city regardless of the season, but as I wandered around the very impressive Festung Hohensalzburg fortress, which overlooks the city, I realised I was too late for enjoying the summer treat of a cold drink at the many outdoor bar bench-and-table viewpoints but too early for the authentic buzz of an Austrian Christmas market. Shan, as Ceit and Donna would say. Shan, indeed.

on my way up to the festung hohensalzburg fortress

no christmas market for catmac

However, the fortress is pretty cool. There’s a funicular railway that can take you up to the top as it is quite a steep walk but have some free Catmac advice: it’s no Arthur’s Seat, i.e. pay less and just walk. Without the funicular experience, it’s €7.80 for an adult ticket. The fortress is one of the largest preserved medieval castle complexes in Europe and definitely worth the visit. However, I wouldn’t say it’s entirely apparent where things are located and I did come away from my 2 hour exploration unsure as to whether I’d actually seen everything or not. There are several exhibitions, a mini museum about the marionette puppets, and you can take an audio guide tour which leads you to the highest viewpoint in the fortress. In addition, there are a number of restaurants and cafés although only one of these was open in the non-significant month of November. Best of all, there’s a free WiFi service available throughout the complex.

magical view even in november

I really fell in love with Salzburg whilst I was there, despite the grey weather which persisted throughout the duration of my visit. You really sense the history surrounding you as you walk the streets and every building is so pretty, even the McDonalds and Spar supermarkets looked like they’d stepped out of a catwalk for high streets.

Although I decided not to go on the Sound of Music tour, I made a point of visiting some of the key locations such as the Mirabell Gardens and on my last morning, together with Bettina and a couple of her friends, we made a mad taxi dash to get a picture with the Leopoldskron palace in the background.

the mirabell gardens, as featured in the sound of music (so i’m told?!)

As with any CatMac expedition, there were several café highlights, as recommended by Bettina. For lunch on Friday, we met at a new vegetarian & vegan café called The Green Garden where we feasted on a delicious and colourful veggie based soup and quiche lunch set. Later in the afternoon, I rested my legs at 220 grad café, taking the opportunity to write some postcards and sample an Austrian hot chocolate. Later that night, continuing the local treat theme, we went for a cheeky wee drink at the Augustiner Brau Beer Hall which was a delightfully refreshing yet sticky experience.

yummy hot chocolate at 220 grad cafe, salzburg

augustiner brau beer hall, salzburg

Bettina prayed out loud as we jogged back to the taxi, post palace photo, which would then take me on to the train station to head back to Munich. She is marvellously open about her faith in Jesus, as many of my North and Central American friends are – part of the reason I enjoy being in their company. Thanks again to Laura, Molly, Oscar and Posey for looking after me when Bettina was away, and hanging out throughout my stay, I really enjoyed chatting to you guys! From the train station, I caught a train back to Germany where I flew on to Brussels to continue my reminiscing, waffling adventure.

oscar, bettina, laura and i made a quick dash to get this pic infront of the leopold skron palace

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Rewarded Salzburg Wanderings

My favourite kind of city is one where you can wander aimlessly and be rewarded constantly. In my head, every continental European city is like this. Salzburg is particularly renowned for its Baroque charm and charmed it did, in spite of the wet and dreary weather conditions.

Bettina wasn’t due back until 12 so after a leisurely breakfast with team intern, I set off to explore. A very scenic 20 minute route led me to the river that runs through Salzburg, reminding me of my very own Inverness somewhat, minus the dramatic mountain backdrop.

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I stumbled across the centre shortly after, and quickly discovered the house which claims the birthplace of composer, Mozart. Whilst the Sound of Music link is of little interest to me, Mozart’s home city earns the intrigue of my Salzburg curiosity. The museum sets the scene, explaining the family background and the musical context in which Mozart featured. It’s worth a visit though the €10 entrance fee is perhaps a little much. You can also visit Mozart’s residence but for me, the birthplace was sufficient.

I wandered back to the palace and was reunited with Bettina who was smiling and laughing as infectiously as ever. Unfortunately, she has to work while I’m here so after getting some instructions on what to do, I set off again to the city centre. Clearly I was having one of my more cultured days as my next stop was the Salzburg museum. I’m not gonna lie, I’m not a museum person but after discovering the museum classified me as a €4 worthy youth, even at the age of 26, I was all over it.

It’s a bit of a random museum, confirmed for me when I watched a video montage of Michael Jackson’s life right beside a display and explanation of the Christian saints. This is part of their ‘mixing the modern with the old’ concept which I’m not sure really works. However, I read through an interesting exhibition regarding the Tasaday people anthropological study in the basement archaeology section, and also learned about the history of theatre and the marionette puppets on the ground floor. There are definitely things of interest in the museum and to be fair, I was rather engrossed in the Michael Jackson video, despite the odd surroundings.

After the museum, I stopped by Kaffe Alchemie, a cafe on the river, for some coffee and cake afternoon treats before heading back to the palace to meet Bettina and the others for dinner.

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Later in the evening Bettina and I headed out to Afro Cafe in the centre where we met up with a couple of the other interns. It’s a bright and vibrant space brimming with colour and the most exciting chai tea presentation I’ve ever seen. How strong would you like your tea? Let any one of these 3 timers decide!

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Love a reunion, so I do.

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CatMac in Austria!

My favourite part of any in-flight magazine is the map at the back where the routes that the airline serves are shown. Every time I feel like I’m looking at the map of Europe or the world for the first time in my life and suddenly a whole realm of travel opportunities spring to mind. There are so many places I’d like to visit and experience.

More recently it’s been people that have determined my travel destinations and this time it’s no different – I’ve come to Salzburg, Austria to visit Bettina, a friend from Brussels, who is doing a rather snazzy internship at the Salzburg Global Seminar.

The majority of today has been spent travelling: first a flight from Edinburgh to Munich with Easyjet, and then a couple of trains to Salzburg Hbf. Unsurprisingly and amusingly for me, Bettina landed a job interview in London the very same day. This means I have arrived at her palace of residence (stay tuned for these pics!), bonded with her very lovely fellow interns, and even had a deep and meaningful with the Hungarian receptionist, pre actually meeting the friend I came to see. She’s back tomorrow though, and with her will come daylight, cafes, Mozart and CatMac’s take on the Sound of Music. Hello, Austria!

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A New Kind of Awesome

In the same way that photographs rarely capture what you can see around you, my time in Brussels, for me, has been poorly documented in writing. Sure, I’ve written 15 odd blog posts, but my 5.5 months has meant more to me than 15 odd blog posts. I’ve barely even mentioned my purpose for being there! I guess that’s the brilliance of life – it cannot be fully expressed by man-made means – thank goodness. You have to be living the experience to fully appreciate its significance.

My Brussels departure was a drawn-out affair. Contrasting with Japan where I finished work on the Thursday and left Kagoshima three days later, my goodbyes in Brussels seemed to go on forever. This was particularly evident in my workplace where I finished on the Friday, enjoying a day full of hugs, treats and sky-rocket temperatures, before reappearing the following week on several occasions as a handy man to put up new blinds in several rooms around the building. You know, as you do.

All of my friends know how attached I became to Japan. I literally couldn’t stop crying when I arrived back in Scotland last summer, so sad that my time in Japan had come to a close. I guess it’s testament to my time in Brussels that my eyes were brimming with tears as the plane touched down at Edinburgh airport last Wednesday evening.

But I remember my first weekend in Brussels where my tears fell for very different reasons. My quiet flat had me questioning whether I’d made the correct choice of accommodation; a late night meant I missed the church service I’d wanted to go to; and a nagging fear taunted me as I wondered, once again, why I had been successful in acquiring a job in the EU quarter of all places, darling.

And then you look back. My flat, my church, my workplace, the friends I met along the way – I couldn’t have asked for more. After Japan, I thought everything else that followed would be rubbish in comparison. But change isn’t necessarily for the worst; it can simply be the catalyst for a new kind of awesome.

One final thought. It has been four years since I last lived in Edinburgh and in that time, it’s fair to say, I haven’t seen so much of my friends from university days. I decided to make a stopover on my way back from Brussels, as thankfully, many of my friends have stayed put in the capital city. There’s always a sense of apprehension every time I go back as I wonder if “this time” it will be different. But once again, I was reassured – my friends are still my friends, regardless of the time that lapses between our meetings.

As if my life is a pattern of symmetry, I have returned to Inverness once again for pastures new.

But that’s a whole other mouthful of waffle.

friends and jumping in the best park in the world

friends and jumping in the best park in the world

if you ever need models for sleeping, let us know

if you ever need models for sleeping, let us know

waiting for the scottish campus to appear any day now

waiting for the scottish campus to appear any day now

this is why we have a conference centre, right?

this is why we have a conference centre, right?

one day they'll invent portable flatmates

one day they’ll invent portable flatmates

friends to be silly with

friends to be silly with

friends to represent scotland with

friends to represent scotland with

friends who consistently make me chuckle

friends who consistently make me chuckle

friends who i appreciate very much

friends who i appreciate very much

Hats Off 2U Belgium

catmacblogs

catmacblogs

Sitting on the windowsill, enjoying the breeze, the sounds of the few cars passing by, the chatter of my flatmates, talking about what they are most looking forward to when they return to their respective home countries. Smelling the rhubarb crumble that Louise made this afternoon, trying to imagine what the flat will be like when she leaves on Wednesday and returns to her Irish homeland. She was my first flatmate. The core flatmate. The quick and witty, barely comprehensible, but hilarious staple element of life chez Titien.

Since my cheeky jaunt to Greece in mid-June, time has flown by. The entire five months in Brussels have flown by. Friends from home have visited. Friends from Brussels have departed forever. German #5 came and went. In the flat, 6 became 5, soon to be 4. “My friends are dropping like flies,” I commented to Jon, days before he left himself.

Brussels is a funny place. Few people seem to love it; more people seem to have a “meh” attitude towards their lives here. I had a Brussels haircut experience about a month ago where my hairdresser, from Manchester (of course), stated that the only reason people come to Brussels is for work. “No one is here out of choice,” he laughed, though he went on to tell me he’d been here for over ten years. I guess I can relate. Brussels was barely on my radar until James mentioned the job at Scotland Europa and I figured applying was worth a shot. I hadn’t ever wanted to visit here, never mind live here.

However, I’ve grown to love Brussels. It probably helps that it’s been sunny for the past three weeks. There are so many parks, so many green spaces, so many locations to chill out. I’m discovering new neighbourhoods, with quirky cafés and bars; I’m also discovering cool parts of my own neighbourhood, way later than I should have (shout out to Marine and the tapas restaurant round the corner – not just because you requested an “apparition” in my blog post!). I love the grandeur of the Grand Place, despite the herds of tourists who gravitate towards it on a daily basis. Every time I walk through the European Parliament, I’m reminded of how much I’ve learned since coming here five months ago. My work, church and flat networks of friends have ensured that I’ve never been bored or lonely. In recent days, I feel like I’ve bonded with Belgium as a whole. I visited the city of Antwerp with the coolest train station in the world and a unique docks/old town combo unrivalled elsewhere in the country.  Sunny weekends saw me visiting beach-side towns Oostende and Knokke, where I discovered that my snobbish “how good can the Belgian coast possibly be?” attitude was very ignorant, and given sunshine, the sand and sea of Belgium can rival the best of Europe’s beaches. Last weekend, I had the opportunity to partake in the Belgian celebrations of their new monarchy as former king Albert abdicated the throne and son Philippe took over the reign. The Belgian/expat masses joined forces, lining the streets to celebrate Belgium’s independence and try to catch a glimpse of their new royal head.

To be honest, it was going to be a tough call for any foreign country to host me following my two years in my beloved Japan. But hats off to you Belgium. I’ve loved it.

The Long Way Home

I’m sitting in Thessaloniki airport, trying to avoid making eye contact with any Ryanair staff whilst shielding my definitely-too-big hand luggage from view. Today, I’ve retraced my steps. I woke up in Sofia, took the 5 hour bus back to Thessaloniki, had a frappé beside the sea in a desperate attempt to improve my non-existent sun tan, and when having had enough of sweating in my jeans, took the cheeky €o.80 bus ride back to the airport where my adventure started 5 days ago.

I was given some more impressions of Sofia on my journey home. I started talking to Sara and Victoria, medic students from Turkey and Greece, who are currently in their first year of studies in Sofia. They study medicine in English, along with a variety of other international students. Who knew. They told me there weren’t any British students on their course (this didn’t come as a surprise) but that there were students from all over the rest of Europe studying alongside them. Studying abroad really is the norm in the rest of Europe, I wish there was more reason/incentive for UK students to do the same. We’re missing out as a country for sure.

The bus stopped at a “happy restaurant” where I joined the girls for a snack and amusingly, our photo was taken and presented in a frame minutes later. “3 happy girls!” Victoria laughed, as we ran back to our bus which of course was waiting on the three of us.

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The bus we took was rather swish. Minutes into leaving Sofia, I was offered coke by the bus assistant and continued to be offered a variety of snacks and drinks throughout the trip. Each seat had a TV attached to it too, not that I made any use of it – much too busy enjoying my free wi-Fi. As we drove out of Sofia, I witnessed the poverty I’d been warned about: shanty towns crammed with damaged, broken buildings yet children running around whilst relatives watched on

The scenery in general on my journey was stunning – I feel qualified to comment, coming from Scotland. I’d love to return and explore both Greece and Bulgaria further.

Back to Brussels and reality and apparently 31 degrees Celsius temperatures! Looks like Thessaloniki is coming back with me…

Sofia Aisling Styleee

saint sofia and coca cola, side by side

saint sofia and coca cola, side by side

The whole point of my cheeky mid-June excursion to yonder Greece/Bulgaria was to visit Aisling, a friend from university, who has spent the past 3 months in Bulgaria doing a work placement through the Leonardo da Vinci programme. This was a programme I’d applied for myself, and had even attended the interview for in Lichfield, near Birmingham, despite having already accepted my job in Brussels. I remember being a little gutted that I couldn’t live out both foreign adventures but through Aisling and this visit, I feel like I kinda have.

the best breakfast ever at Aisling's flat based on goodies purchased from the local market

the best breakfast ever at Aisling’s flat based on goodies purchased from the local market

Aisling and her flatmates have been the guinea pigs of the programme as no group has ever come to Bulgaria before. As a result, their placements seem to have been a little less than satisfactory. However, having spent the past few days with her, I’m so proud of what she’s achieved. If you thought Greek was mental, check out Bulgarian!

writing outside one of the many churches of Sofia

writing outside one of the many churches of Sofia

Aisling can read this language and was translating away at ease whilst I looked on with much the same expression as I had the entire first year in Japan: utter confuzzlement. She’s dealt with a frustrating culture, made herself understood in a country where foreigners, at least from western Europe, are few and far between, and taken the opportunity to learn about the history and culture of a country so unknown to many.

So what did I think of Sofia? Fortunately, we had a beautiful sunny day for Aisling’s guided tour. Architecturally, I loved it. There are an endless number of huge buildings , oozing with grandeur, some which served communist purposes and others which didn’t, but coming from an almost non-existent background knowledge, this didn’t affect my opinion. So many cool pillars. Aisling kept having to stop and look for me as I photographed pillar after pillar.

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There are also a lot of churches – you”d almost think you were in Nairn. The Nevsky cathedral was particularly impressive although I’m generally not the biggest fan of such buildings. The exterior was definitely the highlight. I’m a bit of an education fiend and dragged Aisling to one of the main university buildings which was also grand and consisted of some marvellous pillars. Hmm, what could I study in Sofia…

ooo more pillars

ooo more pillars

From my brief encounter, the infrastructure in Sofia, and in Bulgaria in general is quite poor. We didn’t get a 5-hour bus journey from Thessaloniki for the banter;  rather that was our only option. There are no trains running from Bulgaria to Greece (although this did used to happen suggesting the tracks sstill exist). There are also no direct flights between Sofia and Thessaloniki. I don’t know the reasoning behind this but it’s perhaps a hindrance to both countries involved. Within Sofia itself, there are numerous tram lines which seem to be the main form of transport for residents of the city. However, they are not in the best state.

My opinions are based on very limited experience, but in general, I found the Bulgarian people to be helpful – although Aisling assured me this wasn’t usually the case. One particular incident which amused me was in a cafe, where we stopped off for a cheeky milkshake. A feature of the cafe was that you could write a message on the wall using marker pens. I decided this would be a good opportunity to advertise our respective blogs and put us on the map as international bloggers! The cafe assistants, amused by the explanation, proceeded to then search the web for our blogs there and then. Success. We’re going to be famous Aisling!

our careers as famous international bloggers start here

our careers as famous international bloggers start here

We finished our day together with a traditional Bulgarian meal and then parted ways, Aisling to prepare an English lesson for a 7.30am class tomorrow, me to return to my accommodation and prepare for the long day of travelling home ahead. I’ve loved my brief insight into a different side of Europe – let the adventures continue (and the friends continue to move to handy, interesting locations)!

a cheeky wee bulgarian dinner complete with traditional watered down yoghurt drink - yum

a cheeky wee bulgarian dinner complete with traditional watered down yoghurt drink – yum

Thankful in Thessaloniki

Today, many people all over the world posted dedicated messages to their fathers. Whilst I also sent a message to my awesome daddy James Kenny doll for whose example I am very grateful, it was also a day where I felt particularly thankful for Americans.

Through some cheeky Greek connections of my mother’s, Aisling and I joined Manya and Mimis at their international church service in Thessaloniki. The pastor there is American. As we sang praise in a mixture of Greek and English (a lot of humming was done on my part) I thought of my LifePoint church in Brussels which is almost entirely made up of Americans, many of whom have relocated their families to Brussels in order to support a church plant. This led to me remembering Bill and Becky, an American couple who were an integral part of my life in Japan as they showed Christ’s love in their work at Kibou baptist church in Kagoshima. You can’t attribute any characteristic to all Americans but for all the negative stereotypes they seem to attract, I’ve really welcomed their boldness, confidence and welcoming nature in a variety of locations and times in my life. Today was no different, and Aisling and I felt very welcome, bonding almost immediately with an American Matt, who is doing an internship at the church over the summer. Seriously, where would we be without Americans?

praising God in Greek or in my case lalalalala

praising God in Greek or in my case lalalalala

with our new friend Matt, an intern at the international church in Thessaloniki

with our new friend Matt, an intern at the international church in Thessaloniki

5 hours later, we’re now in Sofia, capital of Bulgaria. You can’t judge any place when you are introduced to it on a Sunday evening but what I can say fairly confidently, is that the difference between southern Europe and eastern Europe is evident from the outset. I haven’t been to any other eastern European country but feel I may have romanticised its image somewhat up until now. Tomorrow, Aisling will give me an insight into her Bulgarian life. Stay tuned.

cheeky gyros for lunch. Greece = yum

cheeky gyros for lunch. Greece = yum